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Importance Of Workwear & Corporate Clothing Uniforms To Better Market Your Museum

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Unless your brand is regionally, nationally, or internationally recognised, you really need to think about Corporate Uniforms and Workwear to better market your museum. Branding is everything in business since it plays a vital role as to how prospective customers perceive it. The workforce needs to exude a professional and trustworthy image to promote the museum effectively. The best way to do this is via corporate branded workwear. So, what role do they play in marketing your business?

Workwear Benefit #1 Creates Brand Awareness

If branding is done right, it will definitely give a competitive edge over your rivals and help in spreading awareness to the public. This is the case for both small enterprises and large successful ones. When employees wear logo embroidered polo shirts at a corporate level for example, your brand name will get recognised with minimal effort required. The staff uniforms should always reinforce the positive company brand values and attitude in the customer’s eyes. This will, in turn, influence a positive response in terms of the customer’s purchasing ability.

Benefit #2 – Strengthens Business Identity

A staff uniform policy is an excellent way of marketing your brand. Having an identity in the business is integral to its success, whether you’re starting out or already have an established company. Continuing to push your agenda and brand to the masses will eventually make it recognisable to clients. This familiarity will provide a feeling of security and trust whenever they see your corporate wear, which can inevitably lead to company loyalty of the product. Format the corporate visual logo, design, and messages on the staff uniforms in such a way that it creates a business identity that customers can easily connect with. Publicly worn workwear are actually ‘walking billboards’ that advertise business services for free.

Benefit #3 – A Uniform Creates A Professional Business Image

For better or worse, first impressions are vital, and this is usually based on what you’re wearing. This is no different, especially in the business world, where you have to appear respectable and professional at all times. When customers have the right impression and attitude towards your business, a professional business image will be established, which will attract and retain clients. Having smart, clean staff branded uniforms will get the right message across to both the management and customers. Certain jobs like chefs require a uniform to exude professionalism.

Benefit #4 – Improves Customer Relationships

Corporate workwear can help a customer to easily identify your business representatives and approach them for product information. This improves the overall customer service delivered fostering better relationships between the business and the client.

Uniforms give off an aura of credibility, competence, and attractiveness. A recent survey found that other methods of marketing like internet, TV, radio, billboard, and newspaper advertising were not as effective and responsive as having a uniform policy which is more cost-effective. Regardless of the corporation’s size, having everyone wear a uniform can have a major impact. After choosing the colours, you’ll have the option of either printing or embroidering the business logo on to the clothing.

5 Steps To Transforming Your Museum Marketing that you need to know

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With the increase in use of technology like computers, internet, smartphone and other gadgets, consumers are always in search of innovative and interesting ways of exploring different places. The search for exciting things has lead to the discovery of many technologically advanced methods, processes and techniques that helps in enhancing consumers experience in different fields. This is the reason why they are also look for new and different way of visiting the museum so that they will have an altogether different experience. This has been possible with the use of digital marketing that has helped the museum to be turned into its online version and you can also make selection with regards to your location so that you will have a customized and personalized experience. Therefore you need to know the 5 steps to transforming your museum marketing so that you will be successful in achieving the mission of the museum.

Importance of museum marketing

The primary goals and objectives of a museum is to collect, research, educate and interpret the historical information in the right manner so that it will be of great help to the general public. Apart from educating the public, the museum also need to do proper marketing so that it will build larger audience base and good amount of revenue which is important for the maintenance and upkeep of the museum as well as all its valuable contents and working staffs. Thus effective planning is very important for creating a good marketing plan that will be able to build an audience base and get enough revenues for the working of the museum in a proper manner.

5 steps to transforming your museum marketing

Change with digital revolution- in the present times, it is important to be creative, adaptable and innovative in the marketing process for survival and to thrive in the changing times. This can be achieved with the use of digital usage that has shifted the manner in which museum is functioning as it has lead to a vast change in the way consumers are visiting museums. Making required improvements- rather than carrying on with the old age traditions, methods and procedures, museum marketing should adapt new and radical changes that helps in attracting more customers that will eventually help in increase in the revenue.

The use of social media platforms– social media is considered as an important part of our present society and when you use it for museum marketing; you will be able to get valuable and profitable returns from your museum business. You also need to incorporate digital tools into your marketing process so that you can get guaranteed results from your business endeavors.

Opting for online presence- new audiences of the present times does not have the time or patience to spend long hours touring through the museums and you can offers them a virtual trip through the place by opting for digitized version of touring the trip. Determine marketing opportunity- finally, you will need to determine the opportunity that you get for museum marketing so that you can make a marketing plan keeping in mind the audiences of the museum in mind.

Museums on Twitter

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The big social media success story of 2009 was Twitter, and as the number of people using the website has exploded so have the number of Museums using it to connect with new and existing audiences.

Country by county
This month my research has found 871 Museums using Twitter, and I would expect the real total to be over 1,000. The majority of these institutions are in the United States (542 museums), but there has been a lot of growth in Europe over the past few months with more Dutch, German and French Museums starting to tweet.

Below: Number of Museums on Twitter by county

Top Museums on Twitter
The number of people choosing to follow the 871 Museums which I have found on Twitter is a massive 1,104,834 and the most followed institution is currently Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid with 81,573 followers (this is up from 1,547 followers in November thanks to Twitter suggesting the Museum as ’someone to follow’ to users in Spain).

This is the first time that I have been able to show that over 1 million people follow Museums on Twitter, and I feel that this is a great statistic to use when making the case for using Twitter in a Museum.

Number of followers
While the most followed Museums shown above each have over 10,000 followers it is worth noting that the majority of Museums on Twitter have less then 1,000 people following their tweets.

Ask a Curator

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Ask a Curator was a worldwide question and answer session with curators from some of the world’s leading museums and galleries, it took place on Twitter on September 1st.

The project followed the ‘Follow a Museum‘ day which I developed earlier this year and which also took place on Twitter, with that event we simply encouraged individuals to look at the cultural venues which tweet and to follow a museum or gallery.

With Ask a Curator I wanted to do something which asked more of both the public and the museums, something that could create dialogue and real engagement. I hoped that this project could give the public unprecedented access to the passionate and enthusiastic individuals who work in museums and galleries and also break down barriers within these institutions, where all to often social media is still the remit of the marketing department.

The project was only promoted through Twitter, and over a few weeks those signed up to participate mushroomed from a handful to over 300. Many institutions told me that this was the first time that their curators had used Twitter and some museums even set up accounts in order to take part in the event.

As well as the many institutions who signed up for the event, I also received enquiries from several individuals, but I took the decision to limit participation to museums and galleries as my aim was to promote these organisations.

As the event approached I struggled to keep up with the requests to take part, and if I was to do a similar event, I would certainly want to have a website which allowed each venue to sign up and upload their own information.

Another element fo the project which I think could have been improved was the press releases. In keeping with the decentralised approach to the event, I asked each museum to see what press they could attract, but I provided no press release template and we may have had better results if I had done this.

The event started very well, with a surprising number of tweets from the launch in New Zealand. As daylight reached Europe the tweets increased and it started to become hard to follow the questions by looking at the hashtag. At around 10.30am the hashtag suddenly started to trend as the top topic in the world.

Step by step guide for Museums getting started on Twitter

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Where to start with Twitter
Twitter is a ‘micro-blogging’ platform, a website where people share what they are doing with others by sending and receiving messages known as tweets.

What defines Twitter is the short format of these tweets, each message is limited to just 140 characters of text, making it quick and easy to update.

These messages are sent and received through the website Twitter.com or through third party applications which bring these tweets on to a computers desktop or a mobile phone.

Setting up your account
To use Twitter you have to join the website (though it is possible to browse the website without joining) selecting a username which you will be known by on the website. Twitter limits the length of usernames to 15 letters, so you may find that you have to abbreviate the name of your museum to fit within this limit.

Please note: I would recommend that those thinking of using Twitter for their Museum, first join as an individual to get to grips with how the website works.

Once you have filled out this information click ‘Create my account’, this will take you through two steps, the first asks if you want to check if any of your friends are on Twitter by checking for members against your Gmail, Yahoo or AOL address book. You can skip this step with the link at the bottom of the screen.

Next you will be offered twenty suggestions of people to follow, these are a mix of celebrities, bloggers and institutions and are unlikely to fit with your organisation, so I would suggest that you skip this step with the link at the bottom of the screen.

Once you have joined you will find yourself on your Twitter homepage, as you are new to the website this won’t yet contain much.

Clicking on ‘Settings’ on the menu in the top right will let you add a little information to your Twitter page, like a ‘One Line Bio’. As Twitter is primarily a person to person network, Twitter etiquette suggests that you should mention who is writing on behalf of the institution in your biography.

For example Brooklyn Museum’s biography reads:

‘We’re the Brooklyn Museum and happen to be one of the oldest and largest museums in the country. Who tweets on this page? Shelley B. is on deck.’

You should also add your Museums website address to your profile information, this sounds obvious, but you would be surprised by how many institutions have missed this vital information.

Location is another important category for a Museum, as this will make it easier for people searching for members in your area to find you.

As well as writing about your museum you can also show a picture both as an icon, which will appear next to everything you tweet, and as a background image which will appear in the background on your profile page.

The icon is 48 pixels x 48 pixels and most Museums use this to show a picture of the exterior of their building, this can be added in GIF, JPG or PNG format on the ‘Picture’ page found in the ‘Settings’ section.

You will need to use a photo editing piece of software like Photoshop to create this icon.

Your background image should be around 1200 pixels x 800 pixels, again this can be a GIF, JPG or PNG file. As the amount of information that you can write in your Twitter accounts biography is limited, many museums include more information in this background image. You can change your background image on the ‘Design’ page in the ‘Settings’ section.

If the colours in your background image don’t sit well with the default Twitter colour palette, it possible to alter this by clicking the ‘Change design colours’ button on the ‘Design’ page.

Whilst you are in your settings you might also want to alter the ‘Notices’ that you will receive from Twitter, the default setting is that you will be emailed every time that you receive a follower or a direct message, while this is exciting to recieve when you get your first few followers, you will soon get tired of it when you are receiving 30 notifications a day.

Getting started on Twitter
Now that your page is up and running, you are ready to start Tweeting. At the top of your Twitter homepage you will see a box that says ‘What’s happening?’

Type ‘is now on Twitter’ in to this box. You will notice that as you type, the number on the top right reduces, this shows the number of letters you have left to type. Click the ‘update’ button and post your first Tweet.

Your first tweet should appear under the text box. You will notice that it has your icon next to it, and starts with your username (which is why we didn’t type YourMuseum in the message)

Following
Now that you have set up your profile and posted your first Tweet, it is time to find someone to follow.

Twitter users see the messages or tweets that other users post on Twitter on their homepage, but only if they follow them. This is the way that most people will see what you write on Twitter.

You can find people to follow by using the ‘Find People’ button on the top menu. There are around 1000 museums on Twitter and it is a good idea to follow cultural organisations in your area.

When you go to another users Twitter homepage you will see a ‘follow’ button under their username and icon, click this to start following them.

Below this you will see a list of their tweets. Browse through these and as you hover your cursor over each Tweet, you will notice that a ‘Reply’ and a ‘Retweet’ button appear.

Select a message that interests you and click the Retweet button. This will rebroadcast this message to your network of followers. Retweeting is an important part of Twitter and it is common for people to Retweet things that interest them.

As well as sharing good information, content or links with your followers, retweeting also makes you more visible to the person or organisation who originally wrote the tweet and makes it more likely that they will follow you and retweet things that you write.

It is important not to retweet too much, stick to messages which you think will benefit your followers.

As well as following people or organisations which interest you (from an institutional point of view) you should also follow those who take the time to follow you, this is important as they will not be able to direct message you unless you do.

Reply
As well as retweeting messages, you can also reply or send a message to another Twitter user, either by clicking the reply button on their Twitter homepage or by using the @ symbol before their username in a Tweet.

A reply is posted publically on Twitter so if you prefer to keep the message private then you can use a direct message.

Direct Messages
A direct message is a private note, this conforms to the 140 characture format of a normal tweet, but is a way of privately corresponding with other Twitter members.

It is only possible to send a direct message to people who are following you.

Links in Twitter
If your linking to information about exhibitions or events, you are likely to want to use website addresses, but these are often to long when Tweets are limited to just 140 charactures.

The way around this is to use a URL shortening service like Bit.ly, this will not only allow you to shorten the length of website addresses, but also lets you track how many people are clicking on each link, which can be useful when measuring the benefits of using Twitter.

What’s a hashtag?
Twitter users use hastags (which look like this #) to link together messages about the same topic. The most common use for this is for events and conferences, however some Museums have started to give each exhibition a hashtag and promote this in promotional literature.

Writing
As well as engaging with other Twitter users, you will also post your own tweets. The amount that Museums do this differs from organisation to organisation, but I’d suggest that you aim for two tweets per day including weekends.

You can choose to either write your tweets on Twitter as you go, or to schedule them using a web based service like Hootsuite or Socialoomph.

Schedule
Between listening, conversations and writing your own tweets you can expect to spend between fifteen and twenty minutes per day managing your museums presence on Twitter.

This would be roughly split into ten minutes in the morning, five minutes at lunch time and five minutes at the end of the day.

Creating a Twitter editorial plan
A mistake that I see many Museums making is to use Twitter to broadcast events listings. Twitter is a great promotional tool, but nobody will follow you if all they are going to get is adverts.

An editorial plan is a good way to get the most out of Twitter, this will set out how much time you will spend on the social network, how often you will tweet and what you will tweet?

This plan should be set out like a weekly diary, with actions penciled in for each day.

How much time will Twitter take?
Twitter is the least time consuming social network and shouldn’t need more then 15 – 20 minutes per day. This will be broken in to a few different actions.

Listening
Firstly you should monitor what people are saying about your Museum, this can be done by either by using the search facility on Twitter or by using a desktop application like Tweetdeck.

When you find someone mentioning your Museum, you should reply to them as you think appropriate (Glad you enjoyed your visit, You should visit this weekend as we have a new exhibition).

As well as searching for people mentioning your Museum, you might also want to use Twitters geographical search facility to look for people in your area looking for something to do at the weekend.

Ideally you should monitor Twitter for mentions of your Museum two or three times a day.

What should a Museum tweet?
Museums need to think beyond using Twitter to announce their latest exhibition, or they will struggle to attract many followers.

An important part of your editorial plan should be not only how often you will use Twitter, but also what you will say in your tweets.

If you intend to post fourteen tweets on Twitter every week, then you need to break this down so that you know in advance what you will write for each day.

For example, every Monday you might post a photo of an object of picture from your collection using Twitpic and ask your
followers to guess what it is. This could be a regular feature for your organisation on Twitter.

Every Tuesday you could tweet about an important historic event which relates to your collection.

Every Wednesday you could link to pictures on Flickr or films on YouTube which have been created by visitors.

As well as these pillars of your editorial plan you should also tweet about things that are happening behind the scenes in your Museum, for example if you are fitting a new exhibition link to pictures of this on Flickr.

Many people who use Twitter on behalf of Museums tell me that they keep a notebook for idea’s and encourage their collegues to share idea’s with them.

You can find my previous blog post on writing more interesting Museum tweets here

What shouldn’t a Museum tweet?
Twitter is a person to person network, and it is important for the person speaking on behalf of your Museum to appear friendly and approachable.

Having said that you need to remember that you are writing on behalf of a Museum, not the best friend of those following your institution and they don’t need to hear about your holidays or social life.

Increasingly Museums are putting guidelines in place to help to control this relationship between the members of staff representing the institution on social networks and their audiences.

Attracting followers
Being interested in people who mention you on Twitter and following people in your area is one ways that you will attract followers on Twitter, but you also need to think about what you do outside of Twitter to tell people about your presence on Twitter.

Your website is the most obvious place to start, add a link to Twitter on your homepage or ask your web designers if they can make your twitter feed appear within your site. You can also signpost people to Twitter through your e-newsletter or Facebook page if you have one.

As well as directing people to Twitter from other places on the web, you should also consider including your Twitter username on the back of leaflets and having signs asking people to tell you about their visit via Twitter, some Museums are even giving each exhibition a hashtag.

Measuring success
What success looks like will differ from Museum to Museum, this shouldn’t just be how many people are following you, but should be about the level of engagement that you are able to achieve with the Twitter community.

– How much are people talking about your Museum?
– How many people have you @replied to?
– How many people have @replied to you?
– How much are you tweeting?
– How many people are clicking on your Twitter links?

You may also want to try and connect Twitter and the real world by having a special event or exhibition preview for your followers on Twitter, how many people will show up?

Conclusion
Twitter is a great tool for Museums to build communities around their brands online, it is easy to use and costs nothing but your time. If you haven’t tried Twitter yet, why not join today and give it a go?

Top museums on Twitter

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As part of my research for my upcoming talk at Communicating the Museum, I’ve been looking in to how museums are using the popular micro-blogging website Twitter.

I thought some readers might find the following table of interest, it shows a top 50 based on how many people are following (subscribing to the messages of) the venues tweets.

I have learnt a huge amount from watching the museums listed above and the way that they are using Twitter, it is interesting to see the difference between how the most successful and least successful differ.

If you are interested in joining Twitter, you might find this guide for Museums getting started on Twitter useful.

Dealing with negative feedback

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Following on from the short piece I posted last week about dealing with negative comments (which was taken from a museum social media handbook I am writing), I have now expanded this in to this blog post. Thanks to those who took the time to share their experience in comments on the first post, I hope many more people will share there feedback on this subject in the comments below.

The latest social media applications for mobile phones make it easy for people to make comments on the move, and these are often flippant, throw-away remarks.

In truth we all make this kind of comment, whether we aren’t happy with having to queue in a shop or whether we don’t like the food in a restaurant, we don’t think twice about these kind of remarks and they often are forgotten as soon as we have made them.

While in the past this kind of comment might have been made to a handful of friends, social media amplifies every complaint, broadcasting them to anyone searching on for a related subject on Google, sometimes for years to come.

While this idea may seem like a good reason not to venture on to social media platforms, it is worth remembering that these comments would appear on social media platforms whether your organisation is active on them or not.

By engaging with users on social media websites you can influence the way that your institution is seen by the communities which exist on these websites. One of the ways that you will do this is by being seen to take negative comments seriously and responding to complaints.

For me, the most positive implication of social media making everyday complaints more visible is that it gives us feedback that we would not have previously had access to, and makes it possible for us to learn from our audiences.

A museum which welcomes constructive criticism and responds by constantly striving to improve is only going to become better, and for an organisation with this mindset, social media can be invaluable.

So, while you don’t need to take negative feedback to heart, you do need to take all comments serious and be seen to act.

How to reply to complaints
How you deal with feedback will depend on your organisation, and how comfortable the management are with social media. Some museums believe that to be truly transparent, they need to answer any complaint made through social media on the platform that the remark has been made, so that other users can see that you are taking feedback seriously, and to invite further debate on the subject.

This level of transparency will not suit every museum, and I believe that it is important not to overstretch your organisation.

The more conservative approach to negative feedback would be to acknowledge the complaint in the public arena of the social media space that it has been made, and to invite the individual who has made the comment to discuss their concern via email, telephone or in person.

To me this is a safer starting point for a museum looking at social media, it makes the venue seem responsive, but lets the organisation deal with the complaint in private, just as the museum would with a complaint made in a venue.

It is worth remembering that it is easier for a museum to start with a more conservative approach and then move towards a more transparent model, rather than the other way around. The most important thing is that the organisation takes onboard feedback and develops a culture of continual improvement to benefit from the knowledge that it’s audiences have chosen to share with it.

Who should deal with complaints will depend on your organisation and the seriousness of what has been said, as most social media spaces are person to person networks, you may choose to address a complaint as an individual working within your organisation, or you may prefer to respond as the museum.

Both routes have there advantages and disadvantages, while it may seem more official to respond as the organisation, this can also jar with the informal nature of these platforms and that in turn, can make the museum seem distant and out of touch.

Personally I feel that it is better to approach a complaint as an individual working for the museum, rather then the museum itself, I feel this makes it easier to build relationships and to build the perception of your organisation being a collection of passionate individuals rather then a faceless institution.

If someone does make a negative comment you may decide that it isn’t appropriate to respond. Much of what takes place in a museum can be interpreted differently by different people and you may choose to ignore a negative response to an exhibition and leave that conversation to be debated by other members of the community.

One thing which you must be careful to avoid is a member of museum staff joining the conversation without identifying their link to the organisation. One example of this backfiring badly was when staff from the Southbank Centre in London added positive reviews of the stage production of The Wizard of Oz to www.whatsonstage.com.

The Guardian newspaper reported in August 2008, that ‘Three posts expressed surprise at the criticism and lavished praise on the show. There was only one snag – the gushing paeans were written by staff at the Southbank Centre; just 75 minutes later, they were caught red-handed. A beady-eyed moderator noticed that the three rave reviews had all come from computers that shared the same IP address, the code that identifies an internet connection.’

The Southbank Centre later admitted that the three reviews had been written by their staff.

When to ignore comments
While most people will be pleased or even bemused to find that their complaint has been recognized by your museum, occasionally you might encounter someone who wishes to make a lot of noise for no real reason. The internet slang for this kind of activity is a ‘Troll’.

A Troll is less likely to make a complaint about your organisation, and more likely to try and be disruptive to your online communities, they may post off topic messages or inflammatory comments to try and deliberately provoke response.

Your starting point in dealing with a Troll, is to decide if they have a genuine point to make, or whether they are just trying to cause trouble. It is important to give them the chance to make a legitimate complaint and I would suggest that you invite them to do this via email, so that it can be dealt with officially. This is important to protect yourself from any claim that you have not given the individual a route to have their complaint heard.

If you do believe that the individual is being disruptive rather than trying to make a constructive criticism or comment then you have various ways in which you can deal with the problem depending on the social media platform.

If the trolling is taking place within a social network, then it is possible to ban a user from posting to your group, while moderation of blogs will allow you to delete any inappropriate comments before they are public.

Sometimes having a guide to acceptable behavior for community members can solve the problem, make it clear that your museum has a wide audience including children and that you can therefore not allow offensive language or vulgar comments to take place on your network.

Having these kind of guidelines also gives the community using these social networks a framework for policing itself, and you will often find that those breaking the rules will be told that they are out of line by other group members.

What to avoid
Ironically, one of the things which can cause the most negative response, is the way in which a museum is seen to deal with a complaint in the first place.

In 2009 New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz made a comment on Facebook about what he believed to be a very low representation of women artists on the 4th and 5th floors of MoMA. Kim Mitchell of MoMA sent Jerry Saltz a reply, which he posted on Facebook at her request.

“Hi all, I am (Kim Mitchell) Chief Communications Officer here at MoMA. We have been following your lively discussion with great interest, as this has also been a topic of ongoing dialogue at MoMA. We welcome the participation and ideas of others in this important conversation. And yes, as Jerry knows, we do consider all the departmental galleries to represent the collection. When those spaces are factored in, there are more than 250 works by female artists on view now. Some new initiatives already under way will delve into this topic next year with the Modern Women’s Project, which will involve installations in all the collection galleries, a major publication, and a number of public programs. MoMA has a great willingness to think deeply about these issues and address them over time and to the extent that we can through our collection and the curatorial process. We hope you’ll follow these events as they develop and keep the conversation going.”

MoMA are very active across the social media space, and it isn’t surprising to see them answering criticism and trying to take part in the conversation, but rather than this comment being seen in a positive way, it drew a lot of criticism not only from those participating in the Facebook conversation, but also on Twitter and in blog posts where people commented that the reply seemed impersonal, PR-like and that the institution was not interested in being part of the conversation. Others have defended the tone of Kim’s email saying that dealing with a ’serious and contentious complaint in a less formal way would have been incredibly bold’.

The response that MoMA have recieved to Kim Mitchell’s email could be enough to put any museum off the idea of proactively responding to criticism in the social media space, if an organisation perceived to be ahead of the curb can fall fowl of the conversation, then is it safe for any institution to respond to criticism on the web.

I personally feel that responding to comments about your museum, whether they are positive or not is essential. This will show that you’re listening, that you want people’s opinions and that this will build trust and social capital in your brand with your audiences.

The majority of feedback that you find written about your organisation on social media platforms is likely to be very positive, but positive action can come out of even the most negative comment, giving a museum the knowledge it needs to keep getting better.

Importance Of Workwear & Corporate Clothing Uniforms To Better Market Your Museum

Unless your brand is regionally, nationally, or internationally recognised, you really need to think about Corporate Uniforms and Workwear to better market your museum. Branding is everything in business since it plays a vital role as to how prospective customers perceive it. The workforce...

5 Steps To Transforming Your Museum Marketing that you need to know

With the increase in use of technology like computers, internet, smartphone and other gadgets, consumers are always in search of innovative and interesting ways of exploring different places. The search for exciting things has lead to the discovery of many technologically advanced methods, processes...

Museums on Twitter

The big social media success story of 2009 was Twitter, and as the number of people using the website has exploded so have the number of Museums using it to connect with new and existing audiences. Country by county This month my research has found 871...

Ask a Curator

Ask a Curator was a worldwide question and answer session with curators from some of the world’s leading museums and galleries, it took place on Twitter on September 1st. The project followed the ‘Follow a Museum‘ day which I developed earlier this year and which...

Step by step guide for Museums getting started on Twitter

Where to start with Twitter Twitter is a ‘micro-blogging’ platform, a website where people share what they are doing with others by sending and receiving messages known as tweets. What defines Twitter is the short format of these tweets, each message is limited to just 140...

Top museums on Twitter

As part of my research for my upcoming talk at Communicating the Museum, I’ve been looking in to how museums are using the popular micro-blogging website Twitter. I thought some readers might find the following table of interest, it shows a top 50 based on...

Dealing with negative feedback

Following on from the short piece I posted last week about dealing with negative comments (which was taken from a museum social media handbook I am writing), I have now expanded this in to this blog post. Thanks to those who took the time...